Great, Greater, Greatest - Three Finnish Depressions

Great, Greater, Greatest - Three Finnish Depressions
Brad DeLong has suggested that we rename the Great Recession the GreatER Depression in Europe as the crisis in terms of real GDP lose now is bigger in Europe than it was it during the Great Depression. Surely it is a very simplified measure just to look at the development in the level of real GDP and surely the present socio-economic situation in Europe cannot be compared directly to the economic hardship during the 1930s. That said, I do believe that there are important lessons to be learned by comparing the two periods. In my post from Friday - Italy’s Greater Depression – Eerie memories of the 1930s - I inspired by the recent political unrest in Italy compared the development in real GDP in Italy during the recent crisis with the development in the 1920s and 1930s. The graph in that blog post showed two things. First, Italy's real GDP lose in the recent crisis has been bigger than during 1930s and second that monetary easing (a 41% devaluation) brought Italy out of the crisis in 1936. I have been asked if I could do a similar graph on Finland. I have done so - but I have also added the a third Finnish "Depression" and that is the crisis in the early 1990s related to the collapse of the Soviet Union and the Nordic banking crisis. The graph below shows the three periods. Three Finnish Depressions (Sources: Angus Maddison's "Dynamic Forces in Capitalist Development" and IMF, 2014 is IMF forecast) The difference between monetary tightening and monetary easing The most interesting story in the graph undoubtedly is the difference in the monetary response during the 1930s and during the present crisis. In October 1931 the Finnish government decided to follow the example of the other Nordic countries and the UK and give up (or officially suspend) the gold standard. The economic impact was significant and is very clearly illustrate in the graph (look at the blue line from year 2-3). We have nearly imitate take off. I am not claiming the devaluation was the only driver of this economic recovery, but it surely looks like monetary easing played a very significant part in the Finnish economic recovery from 1931-32. Contrary to this during the recent crisis we obviously saw a monetary policy response in 2009 from the ECB - remember Finland is now a euro zone country - which helped start a moderate recovery. However, that recovery really never took off and was ended abruptly in 2011 (year 3 in the graph) when the ECB decided to hike interest rate twice. So here is the paradox - in 1931 two years into the crisis and with a real GDP lose of around 5% compared to 1929 the Finnish government decided to implement significant monetary easing by devaluing the Markka. In 2011 three  years into the present crisis and a similar output lose as in 1931 the ECB decided to hike interest rates! Hence, the policy response was exactly the opposite of what the Nordic countries (and Britain) did in 1931. The difference between monetary easing and monetary tightening is very clear in the graph. After 1931 the Finnish economy recovered nicely, while the Finnish economy has fallen deeper into crisis after the ECB's rate hikes in 2011 (lately "helped" by the Ukrainian-Russian crisis). Just to make it clear - I am not claiming that the only thing import here is monetary policy (even though I think it nearly is) and surely structural factors (for example the "disappearance" of Nokia in recent years and serious labour market problems) and maybe also fiscal policy (for example higher defense spending in the late-1930s) played role, but I think it is hard to get around the fact that the devaluation of 1931 did a lot of good for the Finnish economy, while the ECB 2011's rate hikes have hit the Finnish economy harder than is normally acknowledged (particularly in Finland). Finland: The present crisis is The Greatest Depression Concluding, in terms of real GDP lose the present crisis is a GreatER Depression than the Great Depression of the 1930s. However, it is not just greater - in fact it is the GreatEST Depression and the output lose now is bigger than during the otherwise very long and deep crisis of the 1990s. The policy conclusions should be clear... PS this is what the New York Times wrote on October 13 1931) about the Finnish decision to suspend the gold standard:
"The decision of taken under dramatic circumstances...foreign rates of exchange immediately soared about 25 per cent"
And the impact on the Finnish economy was correctly "forecasted" in the article:
"In commercial circles it is expected that the suspension (of the gold standard) will greatly stimulate industries and exports."
HT Vladimir Related post: Currency union and asymmetrical supply shocks – the case of Finland



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