Is Market Monetarism just market socialism?

Is Market Monetarism just market socialism?
The short answer to the question in the headline is no, but I can understand if somebody would suspect so. I will discuss this below. If there had been an internet back in the 1920s then the leading Austrian economists Ludwig von Mises and Friedrich Hayek would have had their own blogs and so would the two leading "market socialists" Oskar Lange and Abba Lerner and in many ways the debate between the Austrians and the market socialists in the so-called Socialist Calculation Debate played out as debate do today in the blogosphere. Recently I have given some attention to the need for Market Monetarists to stress the institutional context of monetary institutions and I think the critique by for example Daniel Smith and Peter Boettke in their recent paper “Monetary Policy and the Quest for Robust Political Economy" should be taken serious. Smith's and Boettke's thesis is basically that monetary theorists - including - Market Monetarists tend to be overly focused on designing the optimal policy rules under the assumption that central bankers acts in a benevolent fashion to ensure a higher good. Smith and Boettke argue contrary to this that central bankers are unlikely to act in a benevolent fashion and we therefore instead of debating "optimal" policy rules we instead should debate how we could ultimately limit central banks discretionary powers by getting rid of them all together. Said in another way - you can not reform central banks so they should just be abolished. I have written numerous posts arguing basically along the same lines as Boettke and Smith (See fore example here and here). I especially have argued that we certainly should not see central bankers as automatically acting in a benevolent fashion and that central bankers will act in their own self-interests as every other individual. That said, I also think that Smith and Boettke are too defeatist in their assessment and fail to acknowledge that NGDP level targeting could be seen as step toward abolishing central banks altogether. From the Smith-Boettke perspective one might argue that Market Monetarism really is just the monetary equivalent of market socialism and I can understand why (Note Smith and Boettke are not arguing this). I have often argued that NGDP targeting is a way to emulate the outcome in a truly competitive Free Banking system (See for example here page 26) and that is certainly a common factor with the market socialists of the 1920s. What paretian market socialists like Lerner and Lange wanted was a socialist planned economy where the allocation would emulate the allocation under a Walrasian general equilibrium model. So yes, on the surface there as some similarities between Market Monetarism and market socialism. However, note here the important difference of the use of "market" in the two names. In Market Monetarism the reference is about using the market in the conduct of monetary policy. In market socialism it is about using socialist instruments to "copy" the market. Hence, in Market Monetarism the purpose is to move towards market allocation and about monetary policy not distorting relative market prices, while the purpose of market socialism is about moving away from market allocation. Market Monetarism provides an privatisation strategy, while market socialism provides an nationalisation strategy. I am not sure that Boettke and Smith realise this. But they are not alone - I think many NGDP targeting proponents also fail to see these aspects . George Selgin - who certainly is in favour of Free Banking - in a number of recent papers (see here and here) have discussed strategies for central bank reforms that could move us closer to Free Banking. I think that George fully demonstrates that just because you might be favouring Free Banking and wanting to get rid of central banks you don't have to stop reforms of central banking that does not go all the way. This debate is really similar to the critique some Austrians - particular Murray Rothbard - had of Milton Friedman's proposal for the introduction of school vouchers. Rothbard would argue that Friedman's ideas was just clever socialism and would preserve a socialist system rather than break it down. However, even Rothbard acknowledged in For a New Liberty that  Friedman's school voucher proposal was "a great improvement over the present system in permitting a wider range of parental choice and enabling the abolition of the public school system" (I stole the quote from Bryan Caplan)Shouldn't Free Banking advocates think about NGDP level targeting in the same way? ---- Posts on central bank as (or not) central planning: Maybe Scott should talk about Hayek instead of EMH It’s time to get rid of the ”representative agent” in monetary theory Guest blog: Central banking – between planning and rules When central banking becomes central planning


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