Six central banks take action, but where is Chuck Norris?

Six central banks take action, but where is Chuck Norris?
Today, the Federal Reserve, the ECB, Bank of Canada, Bank of England, Bank of Japan and the Swiss National Bank announced a coordinated action to lower the pricing on the existing temporary US dollar liquidity swap arrangements by 50bp. This is especially important the European financial sector, which remains underfunded in US dollars and as such the move from the central banks easing strains in the European financial markets. Judging from the initial market reaction this is rightly taken to be monetary easing - especially easing of US monetary policy - stock prices rose, the dollar weakened and commodities prices spiked. Monetary policy, however,  works primarily through expectations and since the six central banks who took action today have said nothing about what they want to achieve in terms of monetary policy targets we are unlikely to have a strong and long lasting impact of this. What we are missing here is the Chuck Norris effect. The central banks need to announce a target - for example that they want to increase NGDP in the euro zone by 10 or 15%. I have already discussed a "crazy idea" to for the major global central banks to take action to ease monetary policy with a coordinated "devaluation" of the dollar, the euro, the yen etc. against a basket of commodities. Today's action from the six central banks show that it can be done. Monetary policy is very powerful - so why not use it? ------ Update 1: Scott Sumner also has a comment on the global monetary action. Update 2: I have in a number of previous post argued against discretionary monetary "stimulus" and argued that NGDP targeting is not about "fine tuning". In that regard Market Monetarists should be skeptical about today's monetary easing even though it is helpful in demonstrating the power of monetary policy and is at least helps curb the crisis - at least in the short-term. See my earlier comments: "Adam Posen calls for more QE – that’s fine, but…", "NGDP targeting is not a Keynesian business cycle policy" and "Roth’s Monetary and Fiscal Framework for Economic Stability"


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