Stock picker Janet Yellen

Stock picker Janet Yellen
If you are looking for a new stock broker look no further! This is Fed chair Janet Yellen at her testimony in the US Senate yesterday:
"Valuation metrics in some sectors do appear substantially stretched—particularly those for smaller firms in the social media and biotechnology industries, despite a notable downturn in equity prices for such firms early in the year."
This is quite unusual to say the least that the head of most powerful central bank in the world basically is telling investors what stocks to buy and sell. Unfortunately it seems to part of a growing tendency among central bankers globally to be obsessing about "financial stability" and "bubbles", while at the same time increasingly pushing their primary nominal targets in the background. In Sweden an obsession about household debt and property prices has caused the Riksbank to consistently undershot its inflation target. Should we now start to think that the Fed will introduce the valuation of biotech and social media stocks in its reaction function? Will the Fed tighten monetary policy if Facebook stock rises "too much"? What is Fed's "price target" in Linkedin? I believe this is part of a very unfortunate trend among central bankers around the world to talk about monetary policy in terms of "trade-offs". As I have argued in a recent post in the 1970s inflation expectations became un-anchored exactly because central bankers refused to take responsibility for providing a nominal anchor and the excuse was that there are trade-offs in monetary policy - "yes, we can reduce inflation, but that will cause unemployment to increase". Today the excuse for not providing a nominal anchor is not unemployment, but rather the perceived risk of "bubbles" (apparently in biotech and social media stocks!)  The result is that inflation expectations again are becoming un-anchored - this time the result, however, is not excessively high inflation, but rather deflation. The impact on the economy is, however, the same as the failure to provide a nominal anchor will make the working of the price system less efficient and therefore cause a general welfare lose. I am not arguing that there is not misallocation of credit and capital. I am just stating that it is not a task for central banks to deal with these problems. In think that moral hazard problems have grown significantly since 2008 - particularly in Europe. Therefore governments and international organisations like the EU and IMF need to reduce implicit and explicit guarantees and subsidies to (other) governments, banks and financial institutions to a minimum. And central banks should give up credit policies and focus 100% on monetary policy and on providing a nominal anchor for the economy and leave the price mechanism to allocate resources in the economy.


WORLD LEADING ADVISORY SPECIALISING IN THIS TOPIC

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