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The Tragic year: 1931

The Tragic year: 1931

Benjamin Anderson termed 1931 the "the tragic year" – these are some of the events in that tragic year: 

The Fed can save the euro

The Fed can save the euro

David Beckworth has a excellent comment on the correlation between NGDP in the US and the euro zone.

The Fisher-Friedman-Sumner-Svensson axis
Bank of Canada is effectively targeting the price level

Bank of Canada is effectively targeting the price level

Last week the Bank of Canada and Canadian government announced - not overly surprising - that it will continue its 2% inflation targeting regime.

Reuter's Hayek vs Keynes debate
Irving Fisher and the New Normal

Irving Fisher and the New Normal

A lot of the debate about how to escape the Great Recession is focused on the question of deleveraging and it is often said that we have entered a period of more or less permanent low growth – a “New Normal”. I fundamentally think the idea of the new normal theoretically and empirically flawed.

Roth’s Monetary and Fiscal Framework for Economic Stability

Roth’s Monetary and Fiscal Framework for Economic Stability

Steve Roth over at www.asymptosis.com has a comment on my previous post ”Be right for the right reasons”, which in itself was a comment on Richard Williamson who had commented on one of my previous comments (“NGDP targeting is not a Keynesian business cycle policy”) so you might consider this as ponzi-commenting…Anyway, Steve’s comment deserves an answer. He has some intriguing ideas.

Be right for the right reasons
NGDP targeting is not a Keynesian business cycle policy

NGDP targeting is not a Keynesian business cycle policy

I have come to realize that many when they hear about NGDP targeting think that it is in someway a counter-cyclical policy – a (feedback) rule to stabilize real GDP (RGDP). This is far from the case from case and should instead be seen as a rule to ensure monetary neutrality.

Use googlenomics to track NGDP

Use googlenomics to track NGDP

Anybody who has been working on a trading floor will know the adrenalin rush one will experience when one of the major sets of macroeconomic data is published – for example US nonfarm payroll numbers. I think most dealers and analysts will recognise this and will acknowledge that it could become nearly addictive to get that feeling. However, I think that this might be a thing of the past due to the technological development.

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