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Most people do "national accounting economics" - including most Austrians

Most people do "national accounting economics" - including most Austrians

Yesterday, I did a presentation about  monetary explanations for the Great Depression (See my paper here) at a conference hosted by the Danish Libertas Society. The theme of the conference was Austrian economics so we got of to an interesting start when I started my presentation with a bashing of Austrian business cycle theory - particularly the Rothbardian version (you know that has given me a headache recently).

Yet another argument for prediction markets: "Reputation and Forecast Revisions:  Evidence from the FOMC"

Yet another argument for prediction markets: "Reputation and Forecast Revisions: Evidence from the FOMC"

I am already spamming my readers today so this will not be a long post. But take a look at this working paper - "Reputation and Forecast Revisions: Evidence from the FOMC" by 

Benn & Ben - would prediction markets be of interest to you?

Benn & Ben - would prediction markets be of interest to you?

Benn Steil from the Council on Foreign Relations has an interesting comment on the Federal Reserve's forecasting performance. I don't really want to discuss Benn Steil's views, but rather the fed research he quotes.

Why did the A’s stop winning? Scott has the answer

Why did the A’s stop winning? Scott has the answer

I have been watching Moneyball. It is a great movie, but unlike Scott Sumner and my wife I have actually no clue about movies. However, economics play a huge role in this movie. So that surely made me interested. It is of course very different from Michael Lewis’ excellent book Moneyball, but it is close enough to be an interesting movie even to nerdy economists like myself.

NGDP level targeting - the true Free Market alternative
Exchange rates and monetary policy – it’s not about competitiveness: Some Argentine lessons

Exchange rates and monetary policy – it’s not about competitiveness: Some Argentine lessons

I think Rob who is one my readers hit the nail on the head when he in a recent comment commented that one of the things that is clearly differentiating Market Monetarism from other schools is our view of the monetary transmission mechanism. In my reply to his comment I promised Rob to write more on the MM view of the monetary transmission mechanism. I hope this post will do exactly that.

Guest post: GDP-Linked Bonds (by David Eagle)

Guest post: GDP-Linked Bonds (by David Eagle)

Guest post: GDP-Linked Bonds, Another Whole Literature to Synthesize into Market Monetarism

Googlenomics and how LTRO might have ended the euro crisis

Googlenomics and how LTRO might have ended the euro crisis

Market Monetarists like David Beckworth have long argued that the European crisis is not really a debt crisis or a fiscal crisis, but rather a nominal crisis. The crisis has been triggered not by too much debt, but rather than by overly tight monetary policy and the resulting drop in nominal GDP.

Clark Warburton: A much overlooked monetarist pioneer

Clark Warburton: A much overlooked monetarist pioneer

When I started this blog it was my plan to write a lot about Clark Warburton. I must admit I have failed to do this, but I still hope to be able to give Clark Warburton the attention he deserves.

Christopher Adolph on the politics of central banking

Christopher Adolph on the politics of central banking

Yesterday I put out a post about central bankers as Niskanen style bureaucrats. I decided that I would look a bit more into the topic. In my browsing for more on this topic a ran into a (revised?) Ph.D. dissertation by Christopher Adolph who is now an assistant professor of political science at the University of Washington, Seattle.The title of the disserttion is "The Dilemma of Discretion: Career Ambitions and the Politics of Central Banking"

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